It was perplexing how we were able to take a box of notecards and a binder full of fashion plates and digitize it.

Niani Tolbert, student participant, Mt. Holyoke College says:

It was a pleasure working in the Digital Humanities Archive Pilot project. As technology becomes more advanced, it is necessary that valuable information not get lost in the switchover. The digital humanities project not only allowed me and other girls to be able to preserve the long and dedicated work of Nancy Rexford, but we are now able to share this information across the world on a database.  After having the opportunity to get a crash course in historic shawl designs, I was able to distinguish and categorize special designs into a time period. The process of scanning, quality controlling, and inputting raw data into the database taught me the importance of project management and made me appreciate preservation even more. It was perplexing how we were able to take a box on notecards and a binder full of fashion plates and digitize it; now, we can search key terms and query those hundreds of pages and cards to our specific interest.

The information that I have learned within such a short time frame is unthinkable. This digital will be able to help others learn and understand historical dress efficiently, without having to look through storage and boxes of cards (That’s what we’re here for!).

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